Global Championship Wrestling
eOnLcZi.jpg

Global Championship Wrestling is a fantasy professional wrestling circuit run by Ryan Niemiller with the TNM7 wrestling simulator. The wrestlers, manager, referees, and other characters are based on real people but the events depicted in the writings are completely fictional. In other words - this isn't real but all in fun. The most recent card takes place on July 5, 1986.

For information on the National Wrestling Federation (Josh Cooper's fantastic circuit that exists in the same universe as GCW), please go to the NWF site.

For information on the World Wrestling Association (Russ Myers' excellent circuit that exists in the same universe as GCW), please go to the WWA site.

For information on Universal Pro Wrestling (Jeff Miller's zany circuit that exists in the same universe as GCW), please go to the UPW site.

1 History

1963-1967

Global Championship Wrestling, or GCW, was started by promoter Marvin Niemiller. Niemiller received financial backing from 3 sources, whose identities he has refused to reveal. Niemiller formed a partnership with more experienced promoters Toots Mondt and Vincent J. McMahon to help him with the specifics of the wrestling business. Niemiller was an untested name in the world of professional wrestling, so he knew he would have to sign some talent that would help garner respect. The first major signing was former World champion Lou Thesz, which added immediate legitimacy to the new promotion. The signing of Thesz proved to be instrumental in luring other big names to GCW, including Buddy Rogers, Antonino Rocca, Bruno Sammartino, Bobo Brazil, and Gene Kiniski. The first show was promoted on January 5, 1963 from Madison Square Garden, an arena that Niemiller was able to sign an exclusive contract with to produce wrestling shows. The inaugural show featured a 16-man tournament to crown the first World champion, which was won by Rogers.

From 1963 through 1967, GCW promoted a card on every fourth Saturday. In 1967, two special cards took place in addition to the every fourth Saturday schedule.

1968-1979

The relationship between Niemiller and Mondt & McMahon became tumultuous throughout 1967 as Niemiller began to make his own calls and didn't consult Mondt & McMahon nearly as much. Mondt & McMahon were still sore after the way in which Bruno Sammartino left GCW in late 1966, so Niemiller's new hot shot attitude did not help. When confronted, Niemiller implied he could do better on his own and severed ties with his former business partners. Mondt & McMahon moved on to form Capitol Sports while Niemiller forged ahead on his own.

In 1971, GCW abandoned their traditional "every fourth Saturday" schedule and instead chose to utilize different dates during the week to help with promotion of events.

1980-1984

On January 1, 1980, contracts were finalized that officially gave control of Global Championship Wrestling to Mark Niemiller, the son of founder Marvin Niemiller. The 29-year old Mark had been working in his father's offices for the better part of 5 years, doing odd jobs and absorbing as much knowledge of the wrestling business as he possibly could. It was no secret in the wrestling industry that Marvin had been looking to get out of the business for quite some time, having been a mighty polarizing personality for the better part of two decades. Mark, with the aid of a few loans, was able to raise the money to purchase GCW from his father and incorporate under the name Hammer of the Gods Sports, Inc. (later shortened to Hammer Sports, Inc.). All the terms of the sale were never fully disclosed, but it is known that James Dudley and Gorilla Monsoon were to be given "jobs for life" if they so chose to stay with the company.

Though initially not much changed during the transition, when business started to suffer, it would be Mark Niemiller's vision that would change the wrestling business forever.

1985-PRESENT

Starting on January 6, 1985, GCW produced its first weekly episodic television program. Entitled "GCW Superstars," this ushered in what was referred to as the TV Era and changed the way the wrestling business was presented. Though GCW events had been shown on limited syndication in the past, this was the first time a consistent television program for wrestling had been established on a national scale. Other wrestling promotions would soon follow suit and the business would be taken to another level.

2 Key Figures

  • Mark Niemiller (Promoter, Chairman)
  • James Dudley
  • Gorilla Monsoon (Producer)
  • Luke Graham (Lifetime contract)
  • Tony Garea (Agent)
  • Jack Lanza (Agent)
  • Chief Jay Strongbow (Agent)

3 Working Agreements

GCW does not have any working agreements with any promotions at this time.

4 Champions

Championship Current Champion(s) Date Won Previous Champion(s)
GCW World Title Hulk Hogan June 17, 1986 King Kong Bundy
GCW Intercontinental Title Ted DiBiase November 2, 1985 Tony Atlas
GCW World Tag Team Titles The Rock 'N Roll Express April 7, 1986 Sgt. Slaughter & Stan Hansen
GCW Television Title Jim Duggan June 24, 1986 Tully Blanchard

Inactive Titles

GCW United States Title

Other Accomplishments

King of the Ring

DEFUNCT

Cow Palace Battle Royal

5 Results

The first show in GCW history took place on January 5, 1963. On January 5, 1985, the first televised show in GCW history, GCW Superstars, took place, ushering in the TV Era.

Results
Results - TV Era

6 Roster

This is the list of various personnel involved in GCW.

Wrestlers
Tag Teams
Stables
Managers
Referees
Announcers

7 Year-End Awards

At the end of each calendar year, GCW presents the GCW Year-End Awards. The awards are decided on by a combination of Board of Directors, fan vote, and the wrestlers, managers, and referees.

Awards

8 Five Star Matches

Every match is given a star rating based on a number of factors: workrate, overall action, the history of the wrestlers and their feud, and crowd reaction. The highest rating given is five stars. The following matches have received that honor:

  • Buddy Rogers vs. Lou Thesz - Boston, MA - February 2, 1963
  • Lou Thesz vs. Bruno Sammartino - Toronto, ON, CA - July 20, 1963
  • Lou Thesz vs. Bruno Sammartino - Washington, DC - January 4, 1964
  • Bill Watts & Johnny Valentine vs. Lou Thesz & Bruno Sammartino - New York, NY - September 12, 1964
  • Lou Thesz vs. The Sheik (Cage match) - New York, NY - April 24, 1965
  • Lou Thesz vs. Bobo Brazil - Chicago, IL - May 22, 1965
  • Antonio Inoki vs. Luke Graham - New York, NY - July 6, 1969
  • Luke Graham vs. Antonio Inoki - New York, NY - December 27, 1969
  • Antonio Inoki vs. Luke Graham - Tokyo, Japan - January 4, 1970
  • Bruno Sammartino & Antonio Inoki vs. Luke Graham & Giant Baba - Pittsburgh, PA - February 21, 1970
  • 16-man Battle Royal for the United States Title - Baltimore, MD - January 13, 1975
  • Larry Zbyszko & Dino Bravo vs. The Graham Brothers - Chicago, IL - January 29, 1976
  • Billy Graham vs. Dory Funk Jr. (Texas Death match) - Toronto, ON, CA - July 5, 1977
  • Billy Graham vs. Dory Funk Jr. - Boston, MA - December 8, 1977
  • Bob Backlund vs. Jimmy Snuka - New York, NY - December 30, 1980
  • Dusty Rhodes vs. Nick Bockwinkel - Baltimore, MD - August 31, 1982
  • Ric Flair vs. Dusty Rhodes - New York, NY - September 16, 1983
  • Ricky Steamboat vs. Rick Martel - Pittsburgh, PA - May 24, 1986

9 Controversies

This section covers backstage news and happenings that helped shape the face of GCW.

Controversies

10 Credits

Graphics are made by Austin Wise, using brushes and gradients from Obsidian Dawn, Tha Sprout, Cybia, Gothika Brushes, PSPAGI, Andrew Buckle and Abneil software ltd, TammySue, Pink Shadow, ElvenSword and kissncontrol. If you notice any brush or item that belongs to you and proper credit has not been given, please contact us and this error will be rectified. This graphic is his and is '''''not''''' for the use of the general public. In other words, please do not use it unless you have his express permission to do so. Thank you.

Unless otherwise stated, the content of this page is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 License